PPC Chat Streamcap – Psychology of PPC

Our PPCChat host Matt Umbro (@Matt_Umbro) hosted a very lively set of questions on this week’s pay-per-click topic “Psychology of PPC”. We tipped the scales with 40 participants this week, in what has been our most active discussion to date! The following is the transcribed Streamcap from the live chat:

Q1: How do you feel PPC would change if searchers better understood the process in terms of setup and costs?

  • Some people would be more careful what they click on… Others would click on ads to spite brands they hate! – Luke Alley (@LukeAlley) +
    • Couldn’t have said it better! – Crystal Anderson (@CrystalA)
  • Potentially less traffic for ads – "I’m not clicking on any ads". See Top vs Side Report in AdWords for potential psychological/behavioral impact of knowing the top are actually ads. – Andy Groller (@AndyGroller) +
    • Good thing Goog is making them look Organic! – James Svoboda (@Realicity)
  • I don’t think it’ll ever happen. Why would they care? I still meet people who don’t know there is a difference b/t organic/paid. – David Kyle (@DavidKyle) +
    • Agree, average searcher doesn’t care. – Melissa Mackey (@Mel66)
  • I think many would be more apt to click on ads, since they *should* take you to exactly what you want. – Michelle Morgan (@michellemsem)
  • People would likely be less wary of ads if they knew of all the policies and procedures. – Amy Hoffman (@Hoffman8)
  • Search queries would likely look much different. CTR would probably increase (knowledge of process = trust in process). – John Lee (@John_A_Lee)
    • I agree, people, more side ads could get clicks. – Mark Kennedy (@markkennedysem)
    • I’m w/ @John_A_Lee on this one. More knowledge = more trust. Could be seen as a better navigation tool too. Ads = more relevant. – James Zolman (@jameszol)
  • I guess position wouldn’t be as important, it would make for some interesting strategies. – Andrew Baker (@SEOEdinburgh)
  • Pretty sure people would go crazy w/ click fraud on companies they didn’t like. – Matthew McGee (@Matthew_McGee)
  • People have a general distrust of marketing. The knowledge would help, but wouldn’t solve everything. – Robert Brady (@robert_brady)
  • If searchers understood it, ads would get more consideration, knowing what companies are committing to be there. – Josh Summerhays (@JoshSummerhays)
  • Many average searchers I talk to think the paid ads are sketchy and SHOULDN’T be clicked. – Matt Umbro (@Matt_Umbro)
    • And that’s why Google is making them look like organic. – Francis Shovlin (@fmshovlin)
    • Agreed. I’ve heard the same thing over and over. (And over). – Jon (@halfbrown)
  • Searchers don’t want to know how the sausage is made. But if they understood QS they might look on PPC more favorably. – Dennis Petretti (@Denetti) +
  • I used to only click on organic links, but once I started in ppc, I’m much more likely to click on ads. Especially with sitelinks. – Michelle Morgan
  • If searchers knew the most expensive kws & what insurance &finance companies pay per click, they’d be mad as hell. – Lisa Sanner (@LisaSanner)
  • At the end of the day if the PPC is done right the searcher will get far better relevance & quality of experience than organic. – Andrew Baker
  • Companies with poor customer service & products that suck would suffer extra clicks! – James Svoboda
  • That’s not a reality, but if so, they would use more discretion when clicking ad placements… likely decreasing clicks. – Tropik Media (@TropikMedia)

Q2: Why do you believe AdWords ads are looking more "organic" (ex: longer headlines, sitelinks, etc)?

  • To get more clicks. – David Beltramini (@dbeltramini)
  • More $$$ for Googlers. – Luke Alley
  • its all about getting searchers to click on their ads. Remember, they are google’s cash cow. – Justin Freid (@Justin_Freid)
  • Bottom line is Google wants to increase CTR and revenue. Altering ad design is enticing users to click. – John Lee
  • Money. – Francis Shovlin
  • Because Google will do whatever it takes to make the most money. – Pamela Lund
  • The less an ad looks like an ad, the better… – John Lavin (@johnnyjetfan)
  • Google likes money. They have some money already. They’d like some more. – Neil Sorenson (@iNeils)
  • Agree with others on A2 – all about the $$$. – Melissa Mackey
  • I think a lot of people already find PPC ads sketchy so the more "organic" they look, the more people trust them. – PurePPCCom (@pureppccom) +
  • To fit within the typical Google SERP look. AdWords = 80%+ of Google revenue.. don’t want to lose that. – Andy Groller
  • Agreed more money for Google. – Darci Mino (@darcimino)
  • I agree so I think if they knew all the regulations, they’d be more trusting. – Amy Hoffman
  • Agreed. I think click fraud would be a huge issue if searches were more educated on terms of set up and costs. – Brandom Holm (@brandon_holm)
  • Seems pretty rhetorical – organic search is deemed "more trustworthy." – Matthew McGee +
  • Bottom line, searchers trust organic ads more? – Matt Umbro
    • Yes. "ads" almost always has a negative connotation. – Michelle Morgan
  • Its all about the revenue per search. – Brennan Brooks (@brennanbrooks)
  • Ads are more relevant in my experience. Especially when they’re curated by experienced ppc marketers. Natural to look organic. – James Zolman
  • Google has made some headway in making paid ads looks more like organic listngs. – Joe McConellogue (@JoeMcConellogue)
  • Users have a better experience when the lines are blurred between ads & organic results. – James Zolman +
  • I dont think its all greed, i think it is to evolve ads to contain more information & present it in a way that is trusted. – Chris Kostecki (@chriskos)
  • The vote has been unanimous. It’s all about the Benjamins for GOOG. – Robert Brady ++
  • Agree w/ what’s been said: trying to visually associate ads more with organic, for trust and so that they are noticed at all. – Josh Summerhays
  • Ads are harder to identify on Laptops. – James Svoboda
    • I would say tablets as well, especially with the new interface. – Matt Umbro
  • Some of it too is searcher fatigue, changing the appearance makes the experience "new" and more likely to click. – John Lee ++
  • Searches are hesitant to click on PPC ads. Making them similar to organic would make them visible – more clicks & conversions. – Nikhil Inamdar (@NikhilInamdar)
  • It will lead to more clicks, which will generate additional revenue. Fact is, people don’t want to see "ads". – Jon
  • When I tell people I make ads online, they assume pop-ups (or "This guy’s a jerk"). If they don’t look like ads – people click. – Francis Hovlin
  • Plain and simple: The Google answer = "Relevancy & User Experience". The #ppcchat answer = "Cash Money". – Andy Groller ++++
  • I wonder if Google will ever test image ads within the paid search results, or at least a company’s logo. – Matt Umbro
    • I think they will sometime soon. Something small at first. – Matt Umbro
    • Or Favicon? – James Svoboda +
    • Image ads on SERPs may look a little too much like banners which translates into "clutter" in most situations. – Andy Groller
    • I’m thinking instead of a text ad an actual image ad you might see on the display network. – Matt Umbro
      • I think it would look too salesly and user experience would be worse. Too many banner ads everywhere else. – Luke Alley
      • Gotcha. they do in image search results sometimes…would disrupt experience a bit on organic side. i’d buy right away! – James Zolman
    • They will definitely test images and other media in ppc ads. Sooner than later probably. – Mark Kennedy
      • Are you thinking more like the FB ad design: small image plus text? – Aaron Robb (@aaron_robb)
    • I think there is a lot more image content testing in the SERPs to come 2011/12. – Andrew Baker
      • Agreed but to what benefit? Kinda goes away from Google’s "clean look" approach, don’t ya think? – Andy Groller
        • They’ll be cute about it no doubt and plenty of testing but they’ll be more images soon I believe. – Andrew Baker
    • I would have to believe that it’s coming, but logos would be awesome. – Darci Mino
    • I think Google is to sensitive to making sure they get repeat users, image ads in serps cheapen the product. – Brennan Brooks
  • leads to a more favorable encounter (and bottom line for Google) when people can’t tell the difference between paid and organic. – Joe McConellogue
  • Users lack info that ads may have been spammy in the past, there are many new policies & procedures to protect them now. – Cassandra McClure (@imcassy)
  • Not sure it’s all directly about $, it’s about relevancy – CTR indicator, which incr loyalty and share, which makes $. – Lisa Sanner
    • I agree – when you are on the level of Google money isn’t the sole reason anymore. – Matthew McGee
  • Yahoo used to run RAIS (Rich Ads In Search) that allow the advertiser to place a logo on branded search terms. – Justin Freid
  • What if organics started looking like google news, then fb ad styles would fit. – Chris Kostecki
  • They had to get money to buy Motorolla SOMEWHERE. – Aaron Levy (@bigalittlea)
  • If the ad is high quality does it matter if it’s paid or organic? If it gets the user what they wanted does it really matter? – Dennis Petretti
  • I think that these enhance value to the searcher and the advertiser ultimately. More specific and direct information. – Tropik Media

Q3: What value propositions do you find work the best for conversion & revenue generation (ex: free shipping)?

  • Depends on what competitors are offering. If everyone has free shipping, need to offer a discount *too*. – Pamela Lund ++
    • I agree with Pamela, free shipping is nice, but isn’t as valuable as it used to be. – Matt Umbro
    • Along what Pamela said, need to make sure the offer is unique. – Michelle Morgan +
    • The best value propositions are unique. – Mike Ryan (@mikeryan2)
  • Any value prop. that begins or ends with the word FREE works pretty good. – John Lavin
  • Having the best product always helps. Outside of typical free delivery/discounts, the simple "more info" often helps. – Joe McConellogue
  • Anything Free – download, shipping, quote, etc. No one likes to pay for anything. – Andy Groller
  • Offer what the competitors don’t. For e-comm, I find better response rate to $ discounts vs. % off. Math is hard. Anything that answers the question "why should I buy from you" – I’m cheaper, I’m better, I’ll show you etc. – Aaron Levy +
  • % off. Price – if low vs. comp. Something that stands out from comp. – Francis Hovlin
  • If competitors aren’t offering anything, free shipping, free trial, no commitment, easy sign up. – Pamela Lund
  • Free Shipping & actual saving amounts build trust and help, but also being aggressive in the offer works better than passive. – Chris Kostecki
  • Free shipping is the old standby. But % off, genuine sales work GREAT when available. – John Lee
  • Coupon codes, (more than half forget to use them) Free (Something) shipping, consult, etc. – David Kyle
  • With higher end products its all about showing a better value than your competitors, not a % off or special discount. – Brennan Brooks
  • Free shipping converts well. It also depends on the client/industry. W/some – 10% off will work great, w/others not so much. – PurePPCCom
  • Depends on the product/service. Free anything is always good. Guarantees, actual pricing, etc. – Matthew McGee
  • Needs to be realistic, "free ipad" screams scam or data mining. – Chris Kostecki +
  • 1 month free (contract), free delivery. %off works when they are over 20%. – Eloi Casali (@Eloi_Casali)
  • Price match is good as well. – Matt Umbro
  • Depends on your target audience. What value proposition/statements are important to them? Focus on that. – Joe Kerschbaum (@JoeKerschbaum)
  • Searchers are always looking for a bargain. Free shipping offers are very popular. – Dennis Petretti
  • If not ecommerce, then actual prices (i.e. real estate rent) to qualify traffic. Set expectations right away. – Andy Groller
  • Depends on client & campaign. Free is always good, discounts are good, downloads and whitepapers are good for some verticals. – James Svoboda
  • Anything free: consultations, booklets, etc. or special coupon code only available in ads. – Amy Hoffman
  • Regardless of deal, I find people scan for the highest number(s) in an ad and click it… perceived value = high when number. – James Zolman
    • Price wars suck for advertisers, but rock for customers. – John Lee
      • I agree. you don’t have to price war to trick a scanner tho. 😉 just add .00 or other number embellishments. – James Zolman
  • I’ve found that a discount of 10% or 15% still doesn’t interest people. – Kristi Davis (@KristiBug)
    • % discounts are relative, $ is absolute! – James Svoboda
      • I agree, a dollar amount is tangible. – Brennan Brooks
  • No matter what you are selling people are going to compare prices so why not something like "Compare away, our prices are the best!" – Matt Umbro
  • Actual value % or £ reductions mirrored on the landing page work well. – Andrew Baker
  • Definitely depends on the product/service & competition. The key is to test and to analyze quality/revenue not just conversions. – Crystal Anderson
  • The best ads are definitely the unique features of the products. – Kristi Davis
    • I would take it a step further and say benefits. – Matthew McGee
  • Thinking of value, remember: Value is more than price (even though it’s important). Value comes from service, availability, etc. – Joe Kerschbaum ++
  • Listing actual product prices, as long as they are competitive and accurate works well in retail. – Pamela Lund
    • We have been getting great results from our PPC Shopping Feed/Ads with the price. – Kristi Davis
  • Also, depends on the type of product. Some people want numbers/features, others want benefits/ideas. – Michelle Morgan
  • For non-retail, differentiation is the key to a value proposition. Anybody can imitate a discount. – Josh Summerhays
  • Free shipping has to be one of the best draws, consumers hate to pay for shipping, but ultimately depends on what your promoting. – Darci Mino
  • Official site works if a brand. Trust, ease, hassle-free. – Lisa Sanner ++
  • Free & cheap don’t always work, if so everyone would go to big box, trust, service can add more value and drive sustainable sales. – Chris Kostecki
    • I personally think the word cheap has a negative connotation attached. – Matthew McGee ++++
      • In some markets where quality is consistent cheap works really well. Cheap flights for instance. – Pamela Lund
  • If you’re not a price leader, you’ve gotta communicate value. Give the customer a reason to pick you. – Aaron Levy
  • Also offering actual solutions targeting users searching error messages or problems is a good one. – Andrew Baker
  • We do many Apt and Senior living clients – luxury/ upscale and "self determination" are valid value propostions there. – David Beltramini
  • There are lots of product variables in our industry, so it’s hard to compare products apple tree to apple tree. – Dennis Petretti
  • Incentivized CTAs, answering questions and visualizing scenarios. – Tropik Media

Q4: Are PPC results harder to show when selling higher priced items or items that customers prefer to see in person first?(I would define a higher priced item as something like a bed or a washing machine.)

  • For big tickets, people research online and then buy in the store. So yes, more challenging. – Mark Kennedy
  • Yes – try selling an apartment or Senior living without someone seeing it first? Tracking is key. – David Beltramini
  • I am not aware of a solution that follows PPC to store sales yet…maybe coupons or a code. – James Zolman
  • High priced if long lead time/sales cycle. If someone needs to physically try it in person, then definitely some difficulty. – Andy Groller
  • In regards to the former, I’d say not necessarily. Had a client sell industrial mixers and consistently get $10k+ AOV from ppc. – Neil Sorenson
  • Just need to find a metric for success. Not gonna buy a car online, but if you get some to schedule a test drive. – Aaron Levy
    • Can you stretch this too far and hurt the sales cycle? – Luke Alley
  • It’s harder for items ppl want to see in person first. If they have to go to the store, they’ll most likely purchase it there. – PurePPCCom
  • No doubt it’s tougher. Tough to trace long-cycle sales back to keywords or even source. – Josh Summerhays
  • PPC to store purchase would be hard. But otherwise, big purchases are made online EVERY DAY. – John Lee
  • Can be. In that case you may want to set up a goal page as the contact/map/directions page. – Pamela Lund +++
  • In my experience, developing a solid first conversion point in a longer conversion path is the first step to showing value. – Brennan Brooks
  • Not if you’re tracking phone calls. – David Kyle
  • Nope. the key is to clearly set goals and expectations at the start that reflect the clients overall goals. – Crystal Anderson +
  • All depends – I mean someone spends 5K/mo and sales 1 item for 20K it’s pretty easy to show the value. – Matthew McGee
  • Comes back to goals though. Clearly define PPC goals with brick & mortar scenarios in mind. – Andy Groller ++
  • I think it depends on your target market – are they looking for a steal or for something upscale. – Amy Hoffman
  • Our sales cycle can take up to 2 years, so its difficult to show results sometimes. Have to be creative with metrics. – Michelle Morgan
  • The other day I looked at a camera in store and found a better price online and purchased there. – Matt Umbro
  • For some items you research in store and buy online (Best Buy hates this, but it happens to them a lot). – Robert Brady
    • This was the store I got all the info from and then purchased online! – Matt Umbro
  • This is where a landing page is king, everything the prospect needs to research & (hopefully) convert. – Andrew Baker ++
  • Sure – that’s where the LP needs to come in & help address the reasons to see in person. the LP & ad should compliment eachother. – Cassandra McClure +
  • If engaging the consumer during the sales process, you can measure the touch points, if not then just feeding the funnel. – Chris Kostecki
  • I also agree that you have to set client expectations so that their goal funnels match the tendencies of their target market. – Amy Hoffman
  • I would say yes. Coupons or in store questions/surveys can help with clarity. – Joe McConellogue
  • I sold log splitters online for some time. Lol. People bought all the time, but 99% didn’t buy – pry more research. – James Zolman
  • Sometimes people do just want directions, but PPCers want a lead or phone call so we push the wrong thing. Have to be careful. – Luke Alley
    • Shift goals and explain to clients the VALUE of doing so and they’ll jump on board as well! – Crystal Anderson
  • If you have big ticket items or require offline closing, need to setup online events to drive these (incentives, contact, reviews). – Chris Kostecki
  • Depends on how results are measured. At the end of the day, if this is anticipated, set clear expectations to evaluate lift with the advertiser. – Tropik Media

Q5: Have your results proven to you that different industries perform better in adCenter compared to AdWords?

  • Nope, never. – John Lavin
  • AdCenter rarely wins in QUANTITY. But frequently kick AdWords’ butt in terms of CPA, conv. rate, etc. – John Lee ++++
  • I’ve had cheaper CPA (largely due to cheap CPC’s) on adcenter. All "percentage" metrics tend to win on Adwords though. – Aaron Levy +
  • AdCenter = lower traffic but higher quality traffic typically. – Andy Groller
  • Pre-Alliance, I would have said yes; now, not so much. And John Lee is right – no volume on adCenter. – Melissa Mackey +
  • I’ve seen that some clients perform better in adCenter than others do in adCenter but not usually better than in AdWords. – Pamela Lund
  • Same story, sometimes more efficient, never more volume. – Chris Kostecki ++
    • Low volume = inefficient in my book. – Melissa Mackey
  • Only time adCenter has won in quantity is when AdWords sucks so bad that I dial back bids/budgets and divert to adCenter. – John Lee
  • Haven’t really noticed any differences. Maybe just a different way of searching for the same thing. – Michelle Morgan
  • In lead gen campaigns I’ve seen some pretty hefty deals come out of adCenter…but also in Google. – Matt Umbro
  • And don’t get me started on radius targeting in @adCenter either. Blog post coming on what really grinds my gears about them. – Andy Groller
  • Entertainment related niches are good in Adcenter, some B2B niches have very low traffic. – Brennan Brooks
  • I honestly believe Bing gets most of it’s search traffic from people thinking the search box in IE will show them Google results. – Matt Umbro +++
  • I think it varies depending on target demographic than rather industries. – Nikhil Inamdar
  • I had success selling Bing mouse pads through adcenter, not so much through Adwords. – Chris Kostecki
  • Not in volume, but when it comes products/services with older demographic, adcenter converts better. – David Kyle
    • I’ve noticed differences in demographics too. Same thing, older in bing. – Michelle Morgan
  • I’ve seen some clients have better months in AdCenter but it was a fluke because normally AdWords is much much better for them. – PurePPCCom
  • Usually lower cpc’s for adcenter, but Google wins hands down everytime. – Darci Mino
  • Even w/the low volume in adCenter, if I can get $2 for every $1 I spend, I’ll do it all day long! – Crystal Anderson +
  • I’ve found financial niches to do better in CPA. – Luke Alley
  • Actually…I played in biz opp and currently play in consumer finance. Policies differ at goog vs msft allowing more ads. So my answer would be yes, adCenter performs better in some industries on a volume level but only due to policies. – James Zolman
  • Even selling Yarn (perfect demo for Bing) Adwords out performed. – Chris Kostecki
  • Yahoo used to do really well, although Google always had the highest quantity of sales. Bing is subpar, in my opinion. – Amy Hoffman
  • If I need to spend some extra budget, I usually expand into Adcenter. – Brennan Brooks
  • Bing & Google – If you want more Bing traffic, blog about Bing… If you want more Google traffic, Blog about Bing. – James Svoboda
  • Years ago I did have a freak client where Yahoo (YSM) out performed AdWords. Haven’t seen it since. – John Lee
  • AdCenter can be a nice add on to AdWords, but IMHO that’s all it is. – Matt Umbro +
  • Seems to be easier to get good ROI from adCenter, probably due to less competition, but AdWords has the volume. – Dennis Petretti
  • IMO, AdCenter is clunky. – Cassandra McClure +++++
  • AdCenter wins conversion rate. Is adCenter or Adwords more strict in terms of ad and keyword acceptance? – Mike Ryan
    • Depends on industry. Adult in AdCenter is tough. – Aaron Levy
      • It’s not tough, it’s impossible. – Melissa Mackey
        • It’s possible, just have to fight through an absurd application process that never ends. scratch that, it’s impossible. – Aaron Levy
  • Google searchers trust Google Search Results. Bing searchers not so much… – James Svoboda
  • Adcenter crushed adwords on conversion rate for retirement annuity campaign last year. – David Kyle
  • This should almost always be a standard expectation instead of an exception. – Tropik Media

Q6: What factors are most important to you when changing a bid on a keyword, placement and/or FB/LI ad?

  • Depends on what I’m tracking. Conversions: conv. rate, cpa. Revenue: margin, ROI, etc. That’s a wide open question! – John Lee
  • Not hitting goals: CPA, CTR, Impressions, etc. – Luke Alley
  • ROI. – Robert Brady +
  • Is it producing conversions, QS, ROI/margin. – Andy Groller +
  • Conversions first and foremost – measured against cost and position, etc. – Mark Kennedy
  • Increased exposure to the RIGHT audience. – Amy Hoffman +
  • Ad Position and ROI – PurePPCCom
  • ROAS first, then impression share & position. – Pamela Lund
  • Impression share, average position. – John Lavin
  • Trends! Even looking at 1 kw is tough though, looking at what happens when individual changes are made to the collective. – Chris Kostecki
    • Agree, Trends are super important! – John Lee
  • Will I still achieve the same CTR / Convs with a lower bid. – Andrew Baker
  • For linkedin, if the ctr of your ad is not above the network avg of 0.025%, imp will drop off rapidly. – Joe Kerschbaum +
  • ROI! If changing a bid causes me to lose money…. then… no! – Aaron Levy
  • Margin % is what I’ve been optimizing bids toward lately. – James Zolman
  • All depends on what goals you have set and how you are measuring them. – Amy Hoffman
  • Amount of data, standard deviation, timelines and the variables that involved during those timelines. – Mike Ryan
  • Always need to look to the bottom line, ROI. But keeping a good average position, so extensions show, is important. – Dennis Petretti
  • Avg position is important for new KWs w/no QS history; beyond that look at ROI. – Melissa Mackey +
  • Is it cost effective and will still convert, and am I already showing in the top 3 regularly? – James Svoboda
  • We have also seen BETTER ROI with LOWER bids. – Melissa Mackey +
  • Anticipated change in profit. – Richard Fergie (@RichardFergie)
  • Engagement/ conversion, placement effectiveness. – Tropik Media
  • Will you raise bids strictly because Google says your bid is not above the first page estimate? – Matt Umbro
    • NO WAY JOSE. – Crystal Anderson
    • No, I look at the #s. – John Lavin
    • No. They fluctuate too much. Usually they go back down the next day. – Michelle Morgan
    • Those first page bid estimates are bogus. Avg. pos 1.5 and I’m still getting them. – Andy Groller +++
      • A broad match I assume. That means you’re being shown in 1.5 for some broad searches but not for that exact phrase. – Pamela Lund
        • No, getting that for exacts. – Andy Groller
    • Yes. I have seen ads fall off when they are ignored. I hate it, but I hate losing traffic/sales more! – Chris Kostecki
    • No, I need tomake that decision, not Google. – Mark Kennedy +
    • No, depends on avg pos & ROI. – PurePPCCom
    • Only if the client INSISTS..Just had this happen even after explaining ROI. – Luke Alley
      • Some people just like spending money… – Michelle Morgan
    • I change bids when I’m not making money, or losing money…period. – Brennan Brooks
      • Usually too late when it gets that far, have to climb out of the hole. – Chris Kostecki
    • No! My parents never raised my allowance just because I recommended that they should. – Amy Hoffman +++
    • I would raise bids to first page bid sometimes. anecdotal findings: it led to A LOT more impression share. and it was profitable. – James Zolman +

Q7: Aside from monthly reports, what tactics do you utilize to make sure clients understand how successful a campaign is doing?

  • Transparency in Google Analytics, constant communication (email or phone). – Andy Groller
  • Quick emails highlighting successes whenever. – Luke Alley
  • Simple phone calls or emails often suffice; sometimes mid-month mini-reports are justified as well. – Melissa Mackey
  • Constant interaction – phone calls, basecamp, emails, etc. – Mark Kennedy
    • Like the Basecamp suggestion, that works well. – Melissa Mackey
  • I write up an executive summary that makes the good stuff (and opportunities for improvement) easy to digest. – Pamela Lund
  • Smoke & mirrors help. – James Zolman
  • Full access to data, frequent calls/emails, interpretation of data, show success from multiple data angles. – John Lee ++
  • Muffin baskets. lots of muffin baskets. Oh, and complete transparency, honesty and analysis. – Aaron Levy
    • In addition to muffins it’s important that you’re educating them and being open to any questions they have. – Mike Ryan
  • Probably different for InHouse but surprise emails to the bosses about big successes. Keep them invested in our marketing! – Kristi Davis
  • Call tracking, for sure! – Brennan Brooks
  • Weekly reports with summaries and optional weekly calls. (Optional for the client, that is). – Amy Hoffman
  • Present year over year stats when applicable. – Matt Umbro
  • Weekly calls, face to face meetings, Quarterly plans reviewed vs. goals! – Crystal Anderson
  • Glad I don’t have this problem. It’s easy when you’re the client. – Dennis Petretti
  • If you have industry avg it can be helpful to let them know how much better they’re doing than competitors. – Robert Brady
  • Full transparency – they OWN the accounts! – Crystal Anderson
  • Dedicated PPC Profile in Google Analytics so they can easily compare other metrics to PPC results. No hiding data! – James Svoboda
  • Now inhouse I put together pretty slide shows…at an agency, a quick phone call goes a long way. – Chris Kostecki
  • When I improve ROI 400% I want to shout it out to the client…but I usually just make a note in an excel document. – Matt Umbro
  • Also important to specifically call out big successes – and show the add’tl opportunities as a result! – Crystal Anderson
  • Also, my clients have access to their accounts at all time. – Mark Kennedy
  • Sometimes conversions aren’t the full story. Show the small victories (CTR, clicks, month-month/year-year increases). – John Lee
  • CTD, give the client a ring when you have a blow-the-doors off day. Everyone loves to hear "we set record!" – Aaron Levy
  • I use Basecamp, calls, monthly meets, emails for major successes and full transparency, analytics helps too. – Andrew Baker
  • Conversion metrics, ad extensions details, analytics breakouts where applicable. – Tropik Media

Q8: Do you feel the anguish against remarketing has decreased since its inception? Why or why not? There was heavy concern from searchers (invasion of privacy, etc) when it first began. Has this changed? Why?

  • Results speak for themselves. – Robert Brady +
  • No, growing much more sophisticated, w multichannel mrktg, VTC are getting less weight than the onset tho. – Chris Kostecki
  • Never really seen anguish towards re-marketing, just ads in general. RM’s been around forever, just new to AdWords. – Aaron Levy +
  • Remarketing works quite well. People talk about the "creepy" factor, but as Robert Brady said, results speak louder. – John Lee
  • Honestly I think it was more the anguish of the lines blending from PPC to Media.. Remarketing isn’t new.. just new in PPC land. – Crystal Anderson
  • It is becoming more acceptable, until someone does it too heavy handed. As long as a balance is struck, it is growing. – Chris Kostecki
  • People may realize ads are "following" them, but just tune it out (like most ads anyway). – Robert Brady
  • Don’t identify me by name in the ad and we’re cool. – Andy Groller
  • As an operator I feel better about it now. At 1st I thought it was a gimmick. Avg searcher anguish is just getting started. – Richard Fergie
  • I think some searchers are creeped out by remarketing but others are just fascinated – regardless, it has always worked for me. – Amy Hoffman
  • People feel for their own privacy, not so much privacy of others & anonymous data. The industry just needs to demystify the dif. – James Svoboda
  • Browsers and websites have been tracking our cookies for all these years, might as well put them to good use. Also, I think people are starting to appreciate seeing relevant ads via remarketing. – Mike Ryan
  • I want more co’s to use this method. I’m seeing the same ad way too many times in my own browsing. – Aaron Robb
  • Anguish on the search/ user side? like most tactics, initial reaction subsides, being supplanted by newer tactics. It’s the lifecycle of innovation. – Tropik Media

Additional Resources

More PPCChats

Don’t forget to stay tuned for the next #PPCchat on Tuesday at 12 noon Eastern, 9 am Pacific and 5pm in the UK. Same Chat time, same Chat channel.

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About the Author

This is a guest post by Paul Kragthorpe, Search Manager at WebRanking in Eden Prairie, MN, #PPCChat Streamcap putterer togetherer, rarely an seo blogger, SEO Padawan, Tweeterer @PaulKragthorpe, and Google+’er PaulKragthorpe.

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One Response to PPC Chat Streamcap – Psychology of PPC

  1. […] host Matt Umbro (@Matt_Umbro) wondered about “Pricing PPC.” This chat wasn’t as active as some, but still a good discussion ensued. The following is the transcribed Streamcap from the live […]

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